If someone had told me the benefits of regular knitting when I was a teenager, I am sure they would have nicknamed me 'the knitting girl'. It has been years since I started creating things from just a pair of needles or crochet and a ball of yearning. The benefits of knitting are so evident not only to me but also to my family and friends.

I still remember transitioning from obligation knitting to doing it for fun and relaxation. At this point in my life, it would be brutal for anyone to try to prevent me from knitting. Even my family knows that on Saturday, from 3 pm to 4 pm, mummy needs a quiet time for knitting.

Knitting has helped me survive through some unsettling periods of my life. From annoyingly slow traffic to long ques, unattended waiting bays, days that I wake up on the wrong side of the bed and personal frustrations. Whenever I am too excited or too low, knitting brings me back to optimum levels.In fact, I usually carry my knitting everywhere. The reason for this is that it helps in preventing stress, anxiety and depression. I even went online to confirm it and to my surprise, some countries have even created 'Stitch Away Stress' campaigns. I totally support the movement because knitting put you in a meditating mood.

Meditation is good for everyone, regardless of gender. Both men and women who have used knitting as a stress coping mechanism can testify to its benefits for mental health. I also asked around, to try and find out if any of my friend crocheters and knitters have experienced the same benefit. My friend Lisa, who boasts of knitting with her husband opened up to me, on how they knitted their way out of stress after both their mums came to visit at the same time, for a week! They have since recovered.

Do you feel a burn in your forearm when knitting? I do too. At first, I just assumed that it was a muscle pool, meaning I should stop and take a rest. However, I realised that the burning feeling always came back so I ran to the internet for answers. I discovered encouraging things like 'Knitting can help prevent Arthritis and Tendinitis.'

There is medical research proving that moving our joints while knitting forces fluid to flow in and out of the cartilage, which keeps the joints hydrated, thereby reducing the risk of arthritis.

I feel like knitting has significant health benefits, that people should be made aware of. Maybe all we need to protect ourselves from stress related diseases is a pair of needles or crochet and a ball of yarn and a quiet session of knitting.